Remote tech workers are paid nearly twice as much as their full-time office counterparts, according to a global survey by Landing.Jobs.

Technology professionals in each region reported higher salaries when they were fully remote or had flexible work arrangements compared to those who had full-time desk jobs, according to the Global Tech Talent Trends 2022 questionnaire.

On average, full-office tech workers earned 1.9 times less than people in completely remote positions.

“This may be because less competitive companies are less likely to work remotely, losing their appeal to the best tech professionals and hurting their competitiveness even more,” the Landing.Jobs report said.

The rate at which remote workers’ salaries increased is also much faster than those in the office.

More than half of the more than 6,500 global respondents who worked full-time in the office said their salaries had not changed or even decreased in the past 12 months.

On the other hand, more than 60 percent of full remote IT professionals said their salaries had increased in the past year.

For the most part, technology professionals also earned higher salaries when working cross-border for companies outside their home country, with the notable exception where the high salaries are established: North America.

Interestingly, a majority of tech workers around the world said they were willing to relocate to another continent, preferably Europe or North America, and European professionals were the only group who preferred to live in their country or continent. to stay.

Quality of life is the main reason people would move abroad for work, with nearly a quarter of respondents saying a better lifestyle would take them abroad.

But better career opportunities and salaries combined were the main motivation for moving for nearly 40 percent of survey respondents, with better safety and cultural curiosity also factors to consider.

Show me the money

Attractive overseas salaries are a concern for Australian employers who risk losing staff to US companies where salaries have been higher of late Local talent index found that Melbourne and Sydney were the most likely places for IT professionals to flee due to uncompetitive salaries.

More troubling news for workers comes via a new survey by recruiters Robert Half, which found that more than half of Australian tech workers are in the process of relocating, or will consider, a job in the next six months, and a further 30 percent said willing to change.

Andrew Brushfield, director of Robert Half, said “the job market still favors the worker”.

“It’s a good time to explore the job market and take advantage of opportunities that offer better pay, greater challenge and greater flexibility,” he said, adding that while pay is important, there are other factors that workers should consider. before disembarking.

“While rising inflation rates position pay as an employee’s primary concern with regard to their job, salary alone is a vulnerable reason to take on a role, especially for a sideways shift.

“Career advancement can often accelerate rewards faster than job hopping between incremental offers, while the negative impact of a poor work-life balance, toxic corporate culture or repetitive workload quickly outweighs the benefits of a pay rise.”

The latest data from the job site Seek shows an overall month-on-month decline in the number of ads in Australia.

But while employees in most industries can look forward to more than 20 percent annual growth in job openings, ICT placements on Seek have been relatively subdued, with a growth rate of just 3.6 percent.

“The ICT industry saw significant growth in job openings until the middle of last year, but has since fluctuated within the same range, while other industries have continued to rise,” said a Seek representative.

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